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Current Network Recognition Voice and Support News

Current News...   SAVE THE DATES:

Current Network Recognition Voice and Support News

AAAA Provides Networking Opportunities

  • 2016 Army Aviation Mission Solutions Summit - 4/28-30
    * Networking Exhibit Center - Over 250 Army & Industry Exhibitors on the Floor!
    * Over 9000 Attendees Each Year
    * Warriors To the Workforce Hiring Event taking place for transitioning Army Aviation Soldiers
    * Visit the AAAA Community Booth!
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AAAA Recognizes Excellence

The 2016 Summit will recognize...
♦ 15 Outstanding Army Aviation Individuals and Units
♦ 3 New Members of the Army Aviation Hall of Fame will be Inducted
   * CW5 Edmund W. Hubard, III
   * COL Harvey E. Stewart
   * GEN James D. Thurman

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AAAA is Your Voice

Supporting the soldier and family

AAAA Supports the U.S. Army Aviation Soldier and Family

  • At the 2016 Summit...
    Soldier Appreciation Dinner Concert featuring Kellie Pickler - Trace Adkins
    ♦ Soldier Cafe' provides Soldiers and their families with discounted meals and a place for rest, relaxation, and fun!
    ♦ Chapter Sponsored Soldiers will enjoy the Summit experience
    ♦ Spouse Professional Sessions are new this year!
    ♦ 3 cool spouse events are being offered - register now as they are filling up fast!
"Above the Best"




Army Aviation Hall of Fame 1998 Induction

Rank and organization: Private First class, U.S. Army, Troop C, 7th Squadron (Airmobile), 17th Cavalry, 1st Aviation Brigade

Place and date: Pleiku Province, Republic of Vietnam, 15 January 1969

Entered service at: Brooklyn, New York

Born: 10 September 1948, Cumberland, Virginia

Citation:
For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty. Pfc. Langhorn distinguished himself while serving as a radio operator with Troop C, near Plei Djereng in Pleiku Province. Pfc. Langhorn's platoon was inserted into a landing zone to rescue 2 pilots of a cobra helicopter shot down by enemy fire on a heavily timbered slope. He provided radio coordination with the command-and-control aircraft overhead while the troops hacked their way through dense undergrowth to the wreckage, where both aviators were found dead. As the men were taking the bodies to a pickup site, they suddenly came under intense fire from North Vietnamese soldiers in camouflaged bunkers to the front and right flank, and within minutes they were surrounded. Pfc. Langhorn immediately radioed for help from the orbiting gunships, which began to place mini-gun and rocket fire on the aggressors. He then lay between the platoon leader and another man, operating the radio and providing covering fire for the wounded who had been moved to the center of the small perimeter. Darkness soon fell, making it impossible for the gun ships to give accurate support, and the aggressors began to probe the perimeter. An enemy hand grenade landed in front of Pfc. Langhorn and a few feet from personnel who had become casualties. Choosing to protect these wounded, he unhesitatingly threw himself on the grenade, scooped it beneath his body and absorbed the blast. By sacrificing himself, he saved the lives of his comrades. Pfc. Langhorn's extraordinary heroism at the cost of his life was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit on himself, his unit, and the U.S. Army.